WHITTON and RITCH -Surname Studies and people from the Island of GRAEMSAY, Orkney

Elizabeth Davis

Elizabeth Davis

Female Abt 1830 - 1898  (~ 68 years)

Personal Information    |    Notes    |    All

  • Name Elizabeth Davis 
    Born Abt 1830  Wicklow, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Female 
    Died 19 Oct 1898  Tasmania, Australia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I31378  Whitton
    Last Modified 16 Oct 2019 

    Family 1 Amos Eastwood,   b. 1826, Doncaster, Yorkshire Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married 12 Oct 1898 
    Children 
     1. Harriett Eastwood,   b. 1862,   d. 9 Feb 1928, Wellington Street, Burnie, Tasmania Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 66 years)  [natural]
     2. Amos Eastwood,   b. 1865  [natural]
     3. William Eastwood,   b. Abt 1860  [natural]
     4. Sarah Eastwood,   b. 1859  [natural]
     5. Hannah Eastwood,   b. 1864  [natural]
     6. James Eastwood,   b. 1869  [natural]
     7. Alice Eastwood,   b. 1860  [natural]
    Last Modified 16 Oct 2019 
    Family ID F7563  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Joseph Roebuck,   b. 1805,   d. 1873, New Norfolk Asylum Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 68 years) 
    Married 26 Jul 1847  Campbell Town at St. Luke's Churc Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Joseph Henry Roebuck,   b. 1850  [natural]
    Last Modified 16 Oct 2019 
    Family ID F11890  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 3 ? 
    Children 
     1. Amelia Eleanor Davis,   b. 20 May 1847, St. John's Hospital, Launceston Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
     2. Elizabeth Davis,   b. 20 May 1847, St. John's Hospital, Launceston Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
    Last Modified 16 Oct 2019 
    Family ID F11891  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • her marriage to Amos Eastwood, dated October 12th, 1898, almost forty years after the birth of their first child. Elizabeth Roebuck was recorded as being 68 years old and a widow. The wedding ceremony was conducted "according to the usages of the Primitive Methodist Church" in Emu Bay between Eliza and Amos Eastwood on that date. From this certificate we learn that Amos was bachelor and a wheelwright by profession. He was aged 72 and was born in Doncaster, Yorkshire. His parents were Amos and Mary Eastwood and his father had also been a wheelwright. Eliza's husband, it states, had died at New Norfolk Asylum. A comment of "cannot remember the year" was recorded. Her birth-place was Wicklow, Ireland, and her parents were not known. Elizabeth signed the certificate with "her mark". On her transportation record in 1845 she had been able to read only. Fifty three years later it would appear that she could still only read.

      Elizabeth stated that she had only three children living (this statement is true in that she had only three children alive bearing the name Roebuck, but also by this time she had given birth to six children, all of whom were registered under the surname of Eastwood). The marriage was witnessed by Amelia Helen Coldhill from Latrobe, and Harriet Whitton, from Burnie. Both were Eliza's daughters; Amelia from her first marriage, who in turn married David Coldhill and Harriet, born in 1862, who married Thomas Whitton and was in fact witnessing her parents' marriage.(16)
      The Story Ends

      One week later, on October 19th, Eliza Davis Roebuck Eastwood died. She was according to the death certificate, aged 69 (born in England) and the cause of death was Cerebral Apoplexy. (17) the closeness of these dates - her marriage on October 12th and her death by October 19th begs the following questions; Were Eliza and Amos aware of her impending death or was it a mere coincidence? Did Amos wish to make "an honest woman" of Eliza before her death? Why did they marry? Why did they not marry sooner, after Joseph Roebuck's death in fact, in 1873? These questions have been put to various people in Tasmania and New Zealand, but no definitive conclusion has been arrived at. Perhaps, like other aspects of Eliza's life, we will never know the real answer! Maybe that is what is so intriguing about this woman, that the, reader can decide for him or herself where the real truth lies.