WHITTON and RITCH -Surname Studies and people from the Island of GRAEMSAY, Orkney

Louis Kyezor

Louis Kyezor

Male 1833 - 1887  (54 years)

Personal Information    |    Notes    |    All

  • Name Louis Kyezor 
    Born 1833  Doncaster Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 7 Jul 1887  110 Edgeware Road, London buried Balls Pond Road Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I20066  My Relatives
    Last Modified 16 Oct 2019 

    Father Louis Kyezor,   b. 1796, Cambridge Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 Oct 1869, Murdered Whitton, Middlesex, see notes buried 14-10-1869 Bancroft Road (Maiden Lane) Jewish Cemetery Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 73 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Mother Sophia Flora Myers,   b. 1803,   d. 19 Dec 1838, Tottenham Court Road, London Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 35 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Married Abt 1924 
    Family ID F7151  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Julia Joseph,   b. 28 Mar 1834, London Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Mar 1917, Willisden, Middlesex Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 83 years) 
    Married 26 Mar 1851 
    Children 
     1. Baron Isaac Kyezor,   b. 1852, Marylebone, London Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1931, St Martin, London Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 79 years)  [natural]
     2. Benjamin Joseph Kyezor,   b. 1854, Middlesex Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Mar 1930, Paddington, London Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 76 years)  [natural]
     3. Joseph Lewis Kyezor,   b. 16 Sep 1854, Marylebone, London Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1873  (Age > 20 years)  [natural]
     4. George Kyezor,   b. 1857,   d. 1924, London Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 67 years)  [natural]
     5. Joseph Harris Kyezor,   b. 1859, Marylebone, London Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Jul 1923, Diggle, Saddleworth, West Yorkshire Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 64 years)  [natural]
     6. Alfred Murray Kyezor,   b. 1862, Marylebone, London Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1906, Kaeo, New Zealand Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 44 years)  [natural]
     7. Julia Kyezor,   b. 1869,   d. 1900  (Age 31 years)  [natural]
     8. Harvey Kyezor,   b. 1871  [natural]
     9. Rose Jeanett Keyzor,   b. 30 Jan 1876, Marylebone, London Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Jun 1908, Southwark Infirmary, Camberwell, London Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 32 years)  [natural]
    Last Modified 16 Oct 2019 
    Family ID F7153  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • He was a master clock and watchmaker in London. He married Julia JOSEPH (1834 - 1917) on 26 March 1851; they had 11 children. (Some of the children changed their name to KEYZOR.) He was the grandfather of Leonard KEYZOR/KEYSOR, VC.

      A Project Report by Jamie Pardoe aged 11 Sussex Family History Group 2013
      Introduction
      I am going to tell the story of an ancestor who was awarded the highest honour
      for bravery. To me this is an amazing story which makes me proud to think I am related to a man who
      did some incredibly brave things in World War One. It is also quite a story with how we came to find out about this man.How we found out about LeonardKeysor VC
      I have interviewed my Dad, Simon Pardoe and asked him to tell me about how we came to know about
      Leonard and how he is connected to our family. This is what I found out. My Grandad, Roy Pardoe (who was my Dad's father) passed away when I was only three but one of the things he did later in his life was to research both the Pardoe family and the Fawn family (Fawn was the surname of my Dad’s mum, Eileen). He started to find out some amazing facts about the Fawn family and that led him to find out more about a fascinating line of ancestors going back several hundred years
      .
      He found out about the Kyezor family (they were also known by other similar names over the different generations such as Keyzor or Keysor and seemed to change this quite a lot but they were the same family ) who had married into the Fawn family line through my Dad's Gran , Winifred Kyezor
      .
      The original Kyezor ancestors were from Germany and some of the family moved to England in the 1700s.
      The name Kyezor is now quite rare but there are
      many direct descendants of the Kyezors across the world and a group of them have worked on finding out as much as possible about the family. It is because of their work that my Grandad was able to find the facts.
      There were some stories handed down in the Fawn
      family that were found out to be wrong.
      For example, the family thought that Dad’s Gran ’
      s name had originally been De Kaiser and that they had dropped this name because of the wars with Germany but this wasn’t true.
      Also there was a story in the family that a Fawn had been the last Liberal MP for Aldershot
      in Hampshire. The family did come from there but there is no evidence of anyone ever being an M
      P.
      There were new even more interesting stories
      as well .
      We had no idea that ‘Granny Fawn had come from a Jewish background. Her Great Grandfather, Louis Keyzor (Senior) was a rich man who owned a lot of property in a place called Whitton near London.
      This is not far from Twickenham and the national rugby stadium. Louis was a real character and people called him ‘
      The King of Whitton ’ because the German word Kaiser means King and Louis owned most of Whitton.
      He did a great deal for his community and gave money to local causesbooks and articles have been written about him.His life was cut short in a cruel
      way when he was murdered in a shooting outside
      one of the local pubs in Whitton in 1869
      –
      The pub is still there today and below
      is a picture of me (on right with my Dad and brother
      Steffan) outside when we went to visit Whitton in 2011.
      It was strange to be standing in a place where over 140 years one of our ancestors had stood and in fact faced an attack that led to him dying soon after.
      The murderer , Thomas Green,
      was a man who lived in one of Louis houses –
      after committing the dreadful crime he then shot himself dead.
      It was later found out that Thomas Green
      was an unknown but important character from history
      because he had gone to the police about
      a famous plot called the Cato Street Conspiracy . His evidence meant the police were able to stop the conspiracy against the government
      which would have changed the course of history if it had been allowed to happen. After this Thomas Green was moved out of London and given a new life in Whitton
      for his
      protection.
      A branch of the Kyezor family was the Durlachers
      and in the
      F
      irst
      W
      orld
      W
      ar a pair of twins fought for
      separate armies, one for the English and one for
      the Australians. They both survived the war but
      tragic
      ally
      Louis Durlacher died from the Spanish Flu epidemic at the end of the war, he was
      only 19.
      We also found out that another member of the Kyezors was an English actress called Rita
      Webb who appeared in comedy films and TV programmes like The Benny Hill
      Show and The
      Frankie Howard Show.
      For me the most amazing story is of a Englishman named Leonard Keysor who won the
      Victoria Cross fighting for the Austra
      lian Army in World War One
      Leonard goes to war
      In August 1914, Leonard
      (
      who had now
      slightly
      changed the way his name was spelt to
      Keyzor
      )
      was working as a clerk in Sydney
      and he
      enlisted in the First Australian Imperial
      Force
      . Before landing in Gallipoli in April 1915,
      he
      trained in Egypt for five long months.
      Sometime over the war Leonard changed the spelling of his surname
      again to Keysor.
      Meanwhile the Russian army
      had
      found themselves threatened by the Turks and called
      the
      allies for
      help
      . The British set off on a Navy expedition to the western shore of Turkey. The
      aim of the expedition was to take the Dardanelles, with Constantinople as the objective. By
      capturing Constantinople the British hoped to link up with the Rus
      sians, knock Turkey out of
      the war and persuade the Balkan states to join the Allies.
      Before long
      ,
      Keysor found himself in the thick of a fierce battle when the Australians landed
      at
      Gallipoli
      . One Englishman described them as
      ‘carelessly brave’. The cond
      itions were
      horrible and many men died in battle and suffered in the trenches. The landscape made
      fighting difficult and the Turks created a system of trenches that were difficult to break
      down.
      It was decided to make a new attack at a place called Lone Pi
      ne. The Turks were
      caught by su
      r
      prise as the Australians rained down on them. There were many los
      ses though
      as
      the
      vicious
      battle dragged on for 5 days. Due to the close quarters fighting there were
      many grenades. This is how our hero won his medal..The Battle of Lone Pine
      ...
      and a
      Courageous Man
      The Turkish bombs were rather like cricket balls as they were thrown over into the trench.
      Keysor would smother them with
      sandbags and even his own coat to put the fuse out!
      When he thought the fuse was long enough he even caught grenades
      and threw then back
      at the enemy
      . He was wounded twice but refused to stop
      and carried on hour after hour
      .
      It was this act of heroism that
      led to the
      award
      of
      the Victoria Cross
      -
      w
      hat has been
      describe
      d
      as ‘one of the most spectacular
      individual feats of the war’