WHITTON and RITCH -Surname Studies and people from the Island of GRAEMSAY, Orkney

Robert Scarth Rannie

Robert Scarth Rannie

Male 1878 - 1958  (80 years)

Personal Information    |    Notes    |    All

  • Name Robert Scarth Rannie 
    Born 1878  Shapinsay, Orkney Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 19 Oct 1958  Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I11936  My Relatives
    Last Modified 22 Jan 2019 

    Father Robert R Rannie,   b. Abt 1840 
    Relationship natural 
    Mother Jane Jessie Scarth,   b. 3 Aug 1845, Kirkwall and St Ola Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Dec 1893, Shapinsay, Orkney Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 48 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Married 13 Oct 1875  Firth and Stennes, Orkney Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F4417  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Daisy Flett,   b. Abt 1880,   d. Aft 1961  (Age ~ 82 years) 
    Married Aug 1913  Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Living
     2. Living
     3. Living
     4. Living
     5. Living
    Last Modified 22 Jan 2019 
    Family ID F4698  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • ROBERT SCARTH RANNIE - by Mrs. Andrew Stewart (Sheila Rannie)

      In 1898, at the age of 18, Robert Scarth Rannie, eldest son of Jane Jessie Scarth and Rev. Robert Robertson Rannie, emigrated from Shapinsay, Orkney, to Binscarth, Manitoba. He spent some time at the home of his uncle Matthew Scarth who had located some years earlier at what is now the extreme south west of the municipality of Silver Creek. He then worked for various farmers in Castleavery district and learned the ways of the country. In 1901 he bought the south west of 34-19-27 from Mr. Wood, and a few years later the north west of 34-19-27 from Mr. Ham. Most of the good land near town had been taken up by this time, and land near the settlement was a much higher price. Oxen were used at first, then the broncos, some of which they were never able to break. The first tractor was a gasoline model, a Titan purchased around
      1922. Crops were good and in the fall of 1912, he had a sale of effects, rented the land to Archie Nichol, and returned to Scotland. Prices were good at this time. The Lees brought a horse to this sale which sold for the princely sum of $217.00, the price of which launched Lara Lee in Agricultural College in Winnipeg.
      The voyage to Scotland proved to be a hazardous one. The ship ran into foul weather and all the lifeboats were swept away in the storm. Dad, being a good sailor, often boasted that he and the captain were the only two on board who never missed a meal.

      In the spring of 1913 he returned, and in August of that year he married Eliza Harriet (Daisy) Flett, who was visiting at the home of her sister Nettie (Mrs. Lorne Crerar). She had also come
      from the Orkney Islands but at an earlier date, having come with her mother and family in 1893 from Stromness, Orkney. When the William Scarths moved from the now Mac Fraser farm to Silverton, Oregon, she went with them to help with the children and stayed to train as a nurse, graduating from the Good Samaritan Hospital in Portland, Oregon on April 21st, 1908. This training served her well in later years when crops were poor and money scarce, Mrs. Rannie again went nursing, and many varied and rewarding experiences she had.

      Dad had a true farmer’s love of the land, and took pride in growing good grain. He exhibited at the Winnipeg Exposition, the Chicago World’s Fair and Brandon. One of the prizes was a land
      packer which he used as long as he farmed. Another prize was the gramaphone, a cylinder model with diamond needle, still in use a couple of years ago.

      This machine proved to be a bone of contention at our house as my mother thought that, as he had a choice, he should have taken the case of silver. I recall many winter evenings spent
      around the dining room table handpicking grain for the seed grain fairs. We possessed only one gasoline lamp, and others in the family needed light to read, write, sew or do homework. This
      lamp was also taken to the Lidford School on the occasion of the Christmas concert or other social events before the building of the Lid-Clif Hall.

      I believe Dad grew the first flax in the district and many were the trials of harvesting and marketing it. Rape and mangles, also firsts in our district, were planted for the pigs and cows. Long rows sown with the garden seeder which seemed even longer when it came to weeding them. Dad had a lifelong interest in pigs, and was for many years a member of the Swine Breeders Association. Even after he bought the Boulton property in Russell, he kept pigs as long
      as he was able to look after them.

      He believed in purity of color in his stock. Yorkshire pigs, Plymouth Rock chickens, Shorthorn cattle, Clyde horses, but always a few light horses for riding and driving.

      About 1919 the southwest quarter of 3-19-27 was purchased. Fifty acres were broken with horses the first year. Then came a wonderful crop of oats. Dr. Shaw on seeing this crop said, “There will likely be a new house there next year,” but Dad built a fine new barn. The old house was taken apart and moved up to ‘3’ with the help of neighbours’ tractors and horses. The main reason for moving being lack of a good and sufficient water supply. The well on ‘3’ had
      been drilled by Beamish Bros. of Shoal Lake at a cost of $2.25 per foot and $1.00 per foot for casing. It was not until 1936 that the new house went up. Then it was built of squared logs hauled
      from Stewart’s mill. These were covered with stucco.

      What we termed the Hudson Bay quarter S.W. 26-19-27, had been rented for a number of years, was bought about this time. Here hay was put up and the main herd pastured all summer.

      In 1921 Dad and Mr. Bowley decided that if a grade were built across Reid’s slough where it narrowed, the road to Silverton would be considerably shorter. The extra mile was always grudged by those who had to haul grain in the rough bumpy wagons. Mr. Bowley tells me Dad waded across the slough to show the Reeve and Council that the water was not too deep for the proposed project. That winter, Arch Bowley, Dad and their hired men set to work to lay a
      foundation of brush for the grade so that the horses and scrapers could be used to complete the road. This attempt was abandoned but brush can still be seen from the new road which was com-
      pleted by Widdicome and Low in 1963 with their modem equipment. The first gravel road past our farm.

      It was about 1926 swamp fever in horses reached epidemic proportions. We lost twenty-two horses over a three-year period with swamp fever and a sleeping sickness. At its height three died in one day.

      After buying the Boulton Manor, my parents did not at first move to Russell. When my brothers returned from overseas, they wanted to get back to the land. Robert bought the west half of 24-19-28 through V.L.A. ,and married Dorothy Armitage of Foxwarren. She was for a time receptionist in Dr. Shaw’s office.

      James and Richard rented the home farm and Dad moved to Russell. Here he died in October 19, 1958. Mrs. Rannie still lives in the old Manor built by the Boultons in 1894. Her daughter and son-in-law, Sheila and Andrew Stewart and family live with her. The north
      wing of the house is rented. James married Mary Leask from Edinburgh, Dick married Noreen Perley of Wolsley, Saskatchewan and Douglas, the youngest, carries on a contracting business from Virden. Robert, the eldest, is the postmaster in Binscarth but still lives on his farm.

      he voyage to Scotland proved to be a hazardous one. The ship ran into foul weather and all the lifeboats were swept away in the storm. Dad, being a good sailor, often boasted that he and the captain were the only two on board who never missed a meal.

      In the spring of 1913 he returned, and in August of that year he married Eliza Harriet (Daisy) Flett, who was visiting at the home of her sister Nettie (Mrs. Lorne Crerar). She had also come from the Orkney Islands but at an earlier date, having come with her mother and family in 1893 from Stromness, Orkney. When the William Scarths moved from the now Mac Fraser farm to Silverton, Oregon, she went with them to help with the children and stayed to train as a nurse, graduating from the Good Samaritan Hospital in Portland, Oregon on April 21st, 1908. This training served her well in later years when crops were poor and money scarce, Mrs. Rannie again went nursing, and many varied and rewarding experiences she had.

      Dad had a true farmer’s love of the land, and took pride in growing good grain. He exhibited at the Winnipeg Exposition, the Chicago World’s Fair and Brandon. One of the prizes was a land
      packer which he used as long as he farmed. Another prize was the gramaphone, a cylinder model with diamond needle, still in use a couple of years ago.

      This machine proved to be a bone of contention at our house as my mother thought that, as he had a choice, he should have taken the case of silver. I recall many winter evenings spent
      around the dining room table handpicking grain for the seed grain fairs. We possessed only one gasoline lamp, and others in the family needed light to read, write, sew or do homework. This
      lamp was also taken to the Lidford School on the occasion of the Christmas concert or other social events before the building of the Lid-Clif Hall.

      I believe Dad grew the first flax in the district and many were the trials of harvesting and marketing it. Rape and mangles, also firsts in our district, were planted for the pigs and cows. Long rows sown with the garden seeder which seemed even longer when it came to weeding them. Dad had a lifelong interest in pigs, and was for many years a member of the Swine Breeders Association. Even after he bought the Boulton property in Russell, he kept pigs as long
      as he was able to look after them.

      He believed in purity of color in his stock. Yorkshire pigs, Plymouth Rock chickens, Shorthorn cattle, Clyde horses, but always a few light horses for riding and driving.

      About 1919 the southwest quarter of 3-19-27 was purchased. Fifty acres were broken with horses the first year. Then came a wonderful crop of oats. Dr. Shaw on seeing this crop said, “There will likely be a new house there next year,” but Dad built a fine new barn. The old house was taken apart and moved up to ‘3’ with the help of neighbours’ tractors and horses. The main reason for moving being lack of a good and sufficient water supply. The well on ‘3’ had
      been drilled by Beamish Bros. of Shoal Lake at a cost of $2.25 per foot and $1.00 per foot for casing. It was not until 1936 that the new house went up. Then it was built of squared logs hauled
      from Stewart’s mill. These were covered with stucco.

      What we termed the Hudson Bay quarter S.W. 26-19-27, had been rented for a number of years, was bought about this time. Here hay was put up and the main herd pastured all summer.

      In 1921 Dad and Mr. Bowley decided that if a grade were built across Reid’s slough where it narrowed, the road to Silverton would be considerably shorter. The extra mile was always grudged by those who had to haul grain in the rough bumpy wagons. Mr. Bowley tells me Dad waded across the slough to show the Reeve and Council that the water was not too deep for the proposed project. That winter, Arch Bowley, Dad and their hired men set to work to lay a
      foundation of brush for the grade so that the horses and scrapers could be used to complete the road. This attempt was abandoned but brush can still be seen from the new road which was com-
      pleted by Widdicome and Low in 1963 with their modem equipment. The first gravel road past our farm.

      It was about 1926 swamp fever in horses reached epidemic proportions. We lost twenty-two horses over a three-year period with swamp fever and a sleeping sickness. At its height three died in one day.

      After buying the Boulton Manor, my parents did not at first move to Russell. When my brothers returned from overseas, they wanted to get back to the land. Robert bought the west half of 24-19-28 through V.L.A. ,and married Dorothy Armitage of Foxwarren. She was for a time receptionist in Dr. Shaw’s office.

      James and Richard rented the home farm and Dad moved to Russell. Here he died in October 19, 1958. Mrs. Rannie still lives in the old Manor built by the Boultons in 1894. Her daughter and son-in-law, Sheila and Andrew Stewart and family live with her. The north wing of the house is rented. James married Mary Leask from Edinburgh, Dick married Noreen Perley of Wolsley, Saskatchewan and Douglas, the youngest, carries on a contracting business from Virden. Robert, the eldest, is the postmaster in Binscarth but still lives on his farm.